What’s Under The Dirt?

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Hi everyone,

Yesterday I had a fine time talking with kids and teachers in Leeton, Missouri for my first live outing since the pandemic began, thanks to my friend Deanna Schuler whom I met when she was in first grade and is now a wonderful librarian. Her library makes you feel like you want to be there from the moment you walk in. I loved it! My books were on display. Thank you for that, too, dear Deanna!

I introduced and signed copies of THE DIRT BOOK for the first time and provided some book marks, thanks to the book’s artist, Kate Cosgrove. Thank you, Kate. It was great fun to explain to the kids that they were the first in the world to see the new book and hear me read from it. The first book I signed was the first I’d signed anywhere. They thought that was cool and so did I.

After talking about THE DIRT BOOK, we took a group of students outside to look at the ground for signs of things that live there. The kids found more than I did.

davidlharrison | June 11, 2021 at 7:44 am | Tags: c, Deanna Schuler, Grace Maccarone, Holiday House, Leeton School, The Dirt Book | Categories: David L Harrison, Deanna Schuler, Leeton School, The Dirt Book | URL: https://wp.me/pBt27-8BA

Mud Season

by Jane Kenyon


Here in purgatory bare ground

is visible, except in shady places

where snow prevails.


Still, each day sees

the restoration of another animal:

a sparrow, just now a sleepy wasp;

and, at twilight, the skunk

pokes out of the den,

anxious for mates and meals. . . .


On the floor of the woodshed

the coldest imaginable ooze,

and soon the first shoots

of asparagus will rise,

the fingers of Lazarus. . . .


Earth’s open wounds — where the plow

gouged the ground last November —

must be smoothed; some sown

with seed, and all forgotten.


Now the nuthatch spurns the suet,

resuming its diet of flies, and the mesh

bag limp and greasy, might be taken

down.


Beside the porch step

the crocus prepares an exaltation

of purple, but for the moment

holds its tongue. . . .
 
Jane Kenyon, “Mud Season” from Collected Poems.

Copyright © 2005 by The Estate of Jane Kenyon.

Used by permission of The Permissions Company,

LLC on behalf of Graywolf Press, Minneapolis, Minnesota,

http://www.graywolfpress.org.

The Writer’s Almanac for Friday, June 11, 2021

otherwise…

JulieRowanZoch

illustrator: Julie Rohan Zoch

 

Otherwise
I got out of bed
on two strong legs.
It might have been
otherwise. I ate
cereal, sweet
milk, ripe, flawless
peach. It might
have been otherwise.
I took the dog uphill
to the birch wood.
All morning I did
the work I love.
At noon I lay down
with my mate. It might
have been otherwise.
We ate dinner together
at a table with silver
candlesticks. It might
have been otherwise.
I slept in a bed
in a room with paintings
on the walls, and
planned another day
just like this day.
But one day, I know,
it will be otherwise.
Jane Kenyon
from Otherwise, 1996

 

I got out of surgery

with a healing incision.

There was no C-diff

or RSV.

I simply glowed!

Never caught pneumonia.

immune system thrived!

never had respiratory arrest.

We danced together

in the ballroom.

twirled around breathing easily

waving hips to the music

sliding our feet smoothly

in sync with each other

in our golden years.

 

by jeanne

(all rights)

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