Feed your faith…

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“Feed your faith and all of your doubts will starve to death.”
—Gaur Gopal Das, author of The Way of the Monk

 

Simplicity


by Henry David Thoreau

Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity! I say, let your affairs be as
 two or three,

and keep your accounts on your thumb nail …

I find it wholesome to be alone the greater part of the time

To be in company, even with the best, is soon wearisome


and dissipating. I love to be alone. I never found the


companion that was so companionable as solitude …

If one advances confidently in the direction of his


dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has


imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in


common hour …

A single gentle rain makes the grass many shades greener.


So our prospects brighten on the influx of better thoughts.


We should be blessed if we lived in the present always, and


took advantage of every accident that befell us. Sometimes, in


a summer morning, having taken my accustomed bath, I sat in my


sunny doorway from sunrise till noon, rapt in a revery, amidst the


pines and hickories and sumachs, in undisturbed solitude and


stillness, while the birds sing around or flitted noiseless through 
the house,

until by the sun falling in at my west window, or the


noise of some traveller’s wagon on the distant highway, I was


reminded of the lapse of time.
 
“Simplicity” by Henry David Thoreau from Walden. Public Domain.

 

 

Definition #293 A Poetry Prose Piece

Walden Pond

Walden Pond

Simplicity

by Henry David Thoreau

Simplicity, simplicity, simplicity! I say, let your affairs be as
two or three, and keep your accounts on your thumb nail …

I find it wholesome to be alone the greater part of the time.
To be in company, even with the best, is soon wearisome
and dissipating. I love to be alone. I never found the
companion that was so companionable as solitude …

If one advances confidently in the direction of his
dreams, and endeavors to live the life which he has
imagined, he will meet with a success unexpected in
common hour …

A single gentle rain makes the grass many shades greener.
So our prospects brighten on the influx of better thoughts.
We should be blessed if we lived in the present always, and
took advantage of every accident that befell us. Sometimes, in
a summer morning, having taken my accustomed bath, I sat in my
sunny doorway from sunrise till noon, rapt in a revery, amidst the
pines and hickories and sumachs, in undisturbed solitude and
stillness, while the birds sing around or flitted noiseless through
the house, until by the sun falling in at my west window, or the
noise of some traveller’s wagon on the distant highway, I was
reminded of the lapse of time.

“Simplicity” by Henry David Thoreau from Walden. Public Domain.

Definition 166 Pencils

neutral colored pencils align

neutral colored pencils align

Pencils were first mass-produced in Nuremberg, Germany, in 1662, and the Industrial Revolution of the 19th century really allowed the manufacture to flourish.

Before he became known for Walden and “Civil Disobedience,” Henry David Thoreau and his father were famous for manufacturing the hardest, blackest pencils in the United States.

Edison was fond of short pencils that fit neatly into a vest pocket, readily accessible for the jotting down of ideas.

John Steinbeck loved the pencil and started every day with 24 freshly sharpened ones; it’s said that he went through 300 pencils in writing East of Eden (1952), and used 60 a day on The Grapes of Wrath (1939) and Cannery Row (1945).

Definition #74 Chimney on Winter Solstice

Snow cottage-1024

Henry David Thoreau said:

“In winter we lead a more inward life.

Our hearts are warm and cheery,

like cottages under drifts,

whose windows and doors are half concealed,

but from whose chimneys

the smoke cheerfully

ascends.”

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