before and after Pentecost…

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flames throw themselves through the air

rise up to the sky of the temple

encircle 3000 gathered for pentecost

jews and gentiles

young and old

thrown into new languages

understanding all

Christ ascends

the comforter descends

in a whirl of fire

a cacaphony of wind

a shaking of earth

the heavens and earth are one babel

one New Jerusalem

at my neighbor’s house…

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Thanksgiving Day 2019

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Thanksgiving Day 2019

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Lynn and grandson (6 years old)

 

CS Lewis reminds me never to be ashamed of being  child-like. That is where imagination lives. Ask any pe·di·a·tri·cian.

CS Lewis
It’s the birthday of the writer who said: “When I was ten, I read fairy tales in secret and would have been ashamed if I had been found doing so. Now that I am fifty I read them openly. When I became a man I put away childish things, including the fear of childishness and the desire to be very grown up.” That’s C.S. Lewis, born in Belfast (1898), the author of the seven-volume children’s series The Chronicles of Narnia, which begins with The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe (1950), the story of four children sent away from London because of wartime air raids. He also said, “Someday you will be old enough to start reading fairy tales again.”
Besides fairy tales and children’s classics, he wrote theological books, including The Screwtape Letters (1942), a novel in which a demon writes to his nephew; and The Great Divorce (1945), where residents of hell take a bus ride to heaven, and Mere Christianity (1952), based on talks he gave on the BBC during World War II.
C.S. Lewis said, “Miracles are a retelling in small letters of the very same story which is written across the whole world in letters too large for some of us to see.”

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