fathers make prophets

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illustration by Joanne Fink

 

“May God bless and keep you.
May God’s radiant light shine down upon you and be gracious to you.
May God grant you—and grant each one of us— the most precious gift of all— the gift of peace in our hearts, in our homes, and in our world.”
May this Shabbat bring each of us a sense of Shalom—Salaam—Peace. As always, you are welcome to share.
Shabbat Shalom,


Joanne

 

Today is Father’s Day. The holiday that we celebrate on the third Sunday in June traces its roots to 1910, but the first recorded celebration of a holiday honoring fathers took place in Fairmont, West Virginia, on July 5, 1908. Grace Golden Clayton wanted to celebrate the lives of 210 fathers who had died in a mining cave-in in Monongah, West Virginia. That particular observance was never promoted outside of Fairmont, and no mention was made of it until years later. The Father’s Day that took root owes its origins to Sonora Smart Dodd, of Spokane, Washington. She heard a Mother’s Day sermon in 1909 and thought it might be nice to honor fathers as well. So the following year, she promoted the idea with the support of area churches. The first bill to make it a national holiday was introduced in Congress in 1913, but in spite of encouragement by President Woodrow Wilson, it didn’t pass. In 1966, Lyndon Johnson issued a proclamation designating the third Sunday in June to honor fathers, and it finally became an official, permanent national holiday during the Nixon administration.

Joyce Carol Oates once said, “A writer who has published as many books as I have has developed, of necessity, a hide like a rhino’s, while inside there dwells a frail, hopeful butterfly of a spirit.

1 Comment (+add yours?)

  1. jeannepoland
    Jun 16, 2019 @ 10:39:17

    To celebrate father’s day with me, you might want to go to the 3 above related posts and click on each one.

    Reply

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